Thursday, 19 May 2016

My joy of his acceptance


You never know what's going to bring that massive grin to your face.  You know the one I mean, the one you can't stop even when you try, where you think if you don't stop your cheeks might squash your eyes closed.   The best one's are those that catch you unawares.  That's exactly what happened to me this morning.

Like most families that have autism in them, the morning routine is fairly fixed.  The routine gives the kids the stability they need to start the day and helps us get out of the house.  Today though there was a slight adjustment to the routine.  It was the first day that Anthony would be taking his ADHD meds.

We told Anthony about both his autism and his ADHD about two months ago.  It was the right time as he'd started to get frustrated with his difficulties and needed to know that these conditions meant he was different, not less, than other people.  Medication was not a quick decision. We all, including Anthony, agreed, he might be helped if he could concentrate a bit better at school. So as he came down the stairs I reminded him that he would have his medicine with his breakfast this morning.  And that's when it happened.

"Remember, we are going to take your medicine this morning."

"Mum?"

"Yes, honey." (I'm fairly liberal with terms of endearment in our home)

"The medicine won't make my brain like everyone else's will it?  Because then I don't want it."

And that's when the grin happened.  I tried my best to answer him through a face that would not stop smiling.

"No sweetie, it's just a tiny little medicine that might help you concentrate a tiny bit better."

I was truly amazed by our son.  We weren't sure how he would react to knowing he had autism and ADHD. He's struggle with some of his other diagnoses like his hypermobility - he just gets annoyed that his loose knees keep 'making' him go on his toes when he walks. But this was brilliant.

Our son had not only come to terms with being different, he was in fact, completely happy with it. He didn't want to not be himself.  He was willing to forgo medication that could help him at school if it meant it changed him as a person. Honestly, I can't contain my joy.  Sometimes it feels like society does nothing but point out how my kids are different even if by simply not being able to accommodate them.  Anthony, does not feel this or if he does, he doesn't care maybe.  He likes who he is.

He had his meds with his breakfast and I busied myself getting the rest of the kids breakfasted and out the door but I did it all with a giant grin.  As I dropped him at school, I reminded the staff to look out for side effects to his meds and then couldn't help but tell his teaching assistant about his comment. She grinned too. One of those big grins.. you know the kind.

Links
Our blog - It's time to tell him about his autism
Our blog - The slippery slope of medicating my kids

27 comments:

  1. That's wonderful :) Go Anthony!

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    1. Indeed. I'm sure there will be times that he is uncomfortable or frustrated (in fact I know there will be, a lot of them), but what better place to start than being happy with yourself? :-)

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  2. Ah bless him, I don't think I'd want to be normal either - whatever that is :) #wotw

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    1. Indeed. Thanks for stopping by.

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  3. That's the best reaction ever!

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  4. Aww, that's awesome! How fantastic that he's happy and content and can embrace his difference. It's an amazingly grown up thing to do too. Go him!
    #WoTW

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    1. I think he has matured a lot recently. Thanks for stopping by.

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  5. This made me grin too! What a fabulous thing to hear. I'm so glad he feels that way, he definitely has the right attitude
    Thanks for linking up to #BloggerClubUK :)
    Debbie

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    1. Yeah, I grin again when I re-read it. But I'm his mum so I'll probably do this quite a lot.

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  6. That is absolutely wonderful and now I'm grinning, too! Love how he understands and embraces his individuality, a lesson for everyone there! Thanks for sharing with #WotW

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    1. It really is very grown up. Thanks for stopping by.

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  7. Hi Ann, Anthony's comment is priceless. Who does want to be like everyone else? I know I don't. Our son has never seemed phased by the fact that he is different, which is a great comfort, but your son embracing being different is excellent!

    Your post has got me thinking. My son has always been a toe walker and after every sort of test you can imagine he was diagnosed with a type of myopathy (this was before his Aspergers diagnosis). He also has hypotonia in the upper part of his body and hypertonia in the lower part. I'm now wondering if this is what causes him to be a toe walker. We were told that toe walking is common in people with autism.

    There's always something else to think about!

    Hope his meds do the trick.

    xx

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    1. We thought his toe walking was a sensory autism thing for years until we went to see a physio. We were worried that his calves were getting shortened and the physio said he had hypermobility! There really is always something else to think about! Thanks for stopping by Debs.

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  8. How wonderful, your lad is such an clever cookie. What a lovely word of the week and that moment it magical, treasure it and keep up the fab work, you must be so proud and happy for him :) High five sister. #WotW

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    1. Definitely one to remember when he's feeling low. Thanks for stopping by.

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  9. This is just lovely, what a boy! I love that he wants to be himself, that's awesome xx

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  10. Those are lovely words! Inspiring! I would smile and grrin all too if I hear my son say that. #wotw

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  11. That's brilliant! Good for him that he wants to be himself. That's actually made my morning. :) X

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  12. What a lovely post, and a lovely response! I think it's great that he doesn't want to be like everybody else. Thanks for linking up to #coolmumclub lovely x

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  13. Fantastic, he should acceptable himself sounds wonderful person X #spectrumSunday

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  14. This is such a wonderfully happy post - bless his heart and good on him for knowing who he is and being proud to be himself. Thank you for joining in our #HappyDaysLinky x

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  15. Aww that is just so lovely. It is worrying when we have to medicate our children, we can only do our best. Thanks for linking up to #HappyDaysLinky x

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  16. Oh how lovely! I don't blame you for that grin...definitely needed! Thank you for joining me on #spectrumsunday. Hope you come by again this week xx

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  17. I can totally understand your grin!! Thanks for linking up to #JustAnotherLinky xx

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  18. I love it that he is so completely happy with his "differentness"! ☺

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  19. What a wonderful moment; and what an astute and happy little boy you have who is embracing his difference. Testament to you too, that he knows you love him just as he is. Every excuse for that great big grin
    xx
    #WoTW

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