Monday, 3 July 2017

Why we may always be part of the latest craze and @dowtkids FidgetSpinners giveaway

Why we may alwasy be part of the latest craze - Anthony playing with a Fidget Spinner

David loves to spin.  He spins toys, wheels, lights and particularly enjoys whole body spinning himself akin to a figure skater.  He'll spin when he's excited and sometimes spin his fingers near his eyes too.   He spins at home, at the playground, on days out and even in the odd restaurant.   And then in the same restaurant he may stand mesmerised by a spinning fan that's just meant to be keeping the patrons cool. Sometimes it's a reaction to having fun, being excited and sometimes it's about being calm.

Spending time with our family is something I treasure, but it's not always easy.  Some days we have a great time, some days we have to go home early, and some days we manage to cope enough to stay out and that might be down to David playing on his iPad or another one of the kids playing with a fidget spinner.

Yes, I understand it looks a bit odd wondering around a visitor attraction with a child who is holding an iPad to his ear and another one that is skipping along while apparently playing with a toy.  But it's not odd to them.  Not at all.  In fact to them, not having an iPad blaring in their ear or not fidgeting is odd - very odd, wrong even.

One of the classic questions we were asked when both boys were being considered for an autism diagnosis was 'do they like spinning the wheels on their toy cars'.  In our case, the answer was yes, but not obsessively. Not recognising a toy car as something to be pushed along with a brum brum, beep beep noise is quite the norm if you have difficulty with imaginative play and this is fairly common in people with autism.  But the paediatrician was actually referring to some kind of sensory stimulation.


Both my boys use sensory input to help them when they feel nervous, out of control or even over excited.  David will focus on his iPad or a spinning fan, using them a bit like blinkers to anything around him he is unsure of it.  He may let the music and pictures from an iPad fill him and take away whatever he may be concerned about or beg the feeling of fast air to fill the space in his body that isn't being met by the environment around him.  His body needs input.

So whilst he sometimes doesn't need this input when he's on a theme park ride (thank goodness as that would be awkward), he does need it when we are sat in a restaurant and there is nothing providing this feeling for his body.

Anthony often seeks movement when he needs to concentrate too.  He's more likely to be able to hold a conversation with you if his fingers are moving about.  And that's with his ADHD meds... he couldn't really sit for long at all before he started his prescriptions. That might not sound odd for a child.  But imagine not being able to sit long enough to go to the loo because your body needed to move and you'd lost focus on what you were supposed to be doing.  Sitting still can sometimes be pretty essential.

So sometimes to enjoy our days out, or at least get the best opportunity to, you'll see our kids enjoying the latest apparent crazes.   They may be playing with iPads and fidgeting about and that's just fine.  But I suspect we may be doing it far past the time when fidget spinners and iPads are trendy... and that's fine with us too.

Day Out With The Kids Fidget Spinners

I'm delighted to be able to offer you the chance to win one of 10 pairs of Fidget Spinners 
(always good to have a spare) thanks to Day Out With The Kids.

Day Out With The Kids is a great resource with information to help families to find things they can do whether that's close to home or away on holiday.  We've used it to find local attractions and parks around our home and when we've been visiting relatives too.  It's great for scoping things out and looking to see what's available and suitable in an area for us and the kids.

If you'd like to be in with the chance to win a pair of their Fidget Spinners, please enter below.


This post is not sponsored. The giveaway is in collaboration with Day Out With The Kids.

Conditions: UK  Residents only. Entrants must be aged over 18.  Entry is via Rafflecopter.  Entries can be made up until midnight on the 28th July 2017. Ten winners will be chosen from all the entries at random the day after closing.  The winners will be contacted within one week of the closing date and have one month to respond.  The Prize is a pair of fidget spinners are pictured above.  No cash alternative. The prize will be sent directly from Day Out With The Kids

Also listed on:
Mudpie Fridays

61 comments:

  1. I've seen these everywhere! Thanks for clearing up what the hell they are! And I'm glad they work for you son (: #KCACOLS

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  2. By just making sure they know what the plan is and talking to them

    Ashleigh

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  3. I bought one for a different reason. My son struggles with using his fingers but he sees his favourite YouTubers with fidget spinners and it is encouraging him to try to hold it to spin it. The best therapy happens when he wants to try! #KCACOLS

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  4. Deep breathing is a useful and easy technique.

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  5. By being calm and talking to them without shouting -time out and regular breaks and refreshments (energy levels seem to get low quickily)

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  6. I talk kindly and join them at their height level

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  7. If it works for your son then that's all that matters as far as i'm concerned #SSAA

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  8. we try to move to a quieter area away from crowds when my son gets distressed.

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    1. Great idea - we try and pick a quiet place too.

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  9. Oscar has always loved spinning, his favourite toy when he was small was Dizzy from Bob the builder because it spun round. We were ripped off by a company selling the fidget spinners! I was devastated. Thank you for linking up to #ablogginggoodtime 🎉

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    1. Oh no - that's rubbish! I hope you managed to get something else sorted.

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  10. It is good to see these spinners used as they were intended; for children with autism and ADHD. They can really be so beneficial. I'm not a fan of typically developing children using these things, although my kids do have one (given as gifts, not by me!). #brillblogposts

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    1. I don't mind so much to be honest. There are lots of sensory toys enjoyed by many kids like light and bubbles tubes, ball bits and trampettes. It might benefit our lot in a different way is all. I think the commercialisation can sometimes make items cheaper to make too and that's not a bad thing. Thanks so much for commenting.

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  11. I think it's great that you know you have something that works for your boys, that gives them that essential input. Who cares what's trendy, it's whatever they'll need, isn't it? Thanks for sharing with #WotW x

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  12. talk to them and discuss the plans for the day and if they wish to change them come to a decision together

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  13. we talk to them, they usually respond to being told what to expect

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  14. My boys are both dyspraxic, they can get emotional and overwhelmed easily so we talk everything through. We also take time out and try to do things early in the day when it isn't too busy. Xx

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  15. Fortunately I only have a niece and nephew so it's vary rare they have a meltdown when they are with me!

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  16. Try & get them to give me a cuddle & take deep breaths!

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  17. Such a brilliant post. Fidget Spinners are a huge hit here, both at home and with the children at school. I'm sure whoever wins the spinner will be very happy indeed. #PostsFromTheHeart

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  18. I try and think of all the tips that I can remember when I'm not in a stressful situation. Diversion techniques, change of helper, food, colours, anything I can think of.
    Thanks so much for linking up at #KCACOLS. Hope you come back again next time
    Mainy

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  19. Fantastic giveaway! Thank you for sharing.

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  20. I haven't introduced these into our house yet but I do think they might help us. We love spinning things but the washing machine isn't our friend at the moment ;0)

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  21. Spinners seem to help here too, they're a useful distraction tool if I can sense that a sensory overload is imminent
    #SSAmazingAchievements

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  22. My nephew and neighbour both have ADHD and have these and they've actually been really helpful for them both. #kcacols

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  23. It is fascinating to see how these fidget spinners have made it into the mainstream playground & I'm glad the fidget spinner have helped. My children have one each and are fascinated by it; they can't do any tricks they just watch them spin. There is something mesmerizing about them!
    #WoTW

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  24. sitting for 10 minutes somewhere a bit quieter, playing eye spy or just sitting and looking around at things

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  25. I'm so glad these work for you. I think they can be very helpful. #bestandworst

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  26. we go and sit somewhere a little quieter the fidget spinners have really helped in our house too

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  27. Good giveaway , we try and talk to them.

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  28. My son struggles to use his fingers and can't play with his fidget spinner. But he is determined to master it and is working hard on his motor skills without realising it. Use whatever works for your child.x #KCACOLS

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  29. Take time out and give them time to calm down and have a drink

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  30. A calm time out with a book xx

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  31. These fidget spinners are everywhere!!! Hubby even brought one home but thankfully his broke within days haha!
    Thank you for sharing this with us at #TriumphantTales. I hope to see you back on Tuesday.

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  32. with 2 autistic boys i need lots of sensory things they can chew/twist pull ect.... i think these look great

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  33. Time out in another room until they decide they are calm enough to join us. Discussing what happened when they feel ready to do so

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  34. I find these really therapeutic and can see why they are so useful! Glad they have helped David. Thanks for sharing with #bestandworst x

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  35. We just sit still and look around us

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  36. I think one good thing that has potentially come out of the fidget spinner craze is a better understanding of some children's need for more sensory input, to fiddle with something or listen to something to be able to concentrate or focus. x #KCACOLS

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    1. My other half listens to music when he is working a lot. When I'm in a meeting I fiddle with a biro, when I'm teaching I'm holding a wipe board marker. Whatever works for us all. Thanks so much for commenting.

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  37. Telling them to quieten down, can help :- Depending on age / stage of child development, and level of Respect, etc. Also :- May be tired, thirsty, needing toilet. So Be Aware. Offer anything child might need e.g. Drink of water, etc. Have items which are safe for child and will occupy, or distract the child ( from being aware of time elapsing, etc).

    Rachel Craig

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  38. keep remindering them what we are doing next and at what time -- keeping them informed

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  39. I always resort to a little reverse psychology where I feign boredom and suggest going home...they soon buck up their interest and want to stay ;)

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  40. Try and talk calmly to them and show them something else/different

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  41. Normally i either take them away from the situation till they calm down or i distract them with something like a puzzle

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    1. Distraction is a really good tactic. We take things with us just for this reason! Thanks everyone for commenting.

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  42. Move to a quieter spot if possible, give food, drink and hugs then when the worst is over talk about what to do next. It may be your child has had enough and just wants the security of home. Days out can be a bit overwhelming :)

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  43. Time out to calm down is part of the children's routine, wherever we are.

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  44. distract them! and listen. whats a small thing to me is their whole world right now

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  45. Take time outs and give them a chance to calm down.

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  46. Usually we try to find a distraction or somewhere calm and quiet to sit for 10 minutes and something to drink/eat

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  47. Try to distract them or give them time out. Doing a "quiet" activity helps too ie watching the animals or looking for insects (luckily they are weird and enjoy that). Take time to understand that they are just learning too, so the "minute" thing they are getting excited about is HUGE to them.

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  48. i think they are great to give them something else to focus on
    a distraction away from a stressful situation

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  49. We go over and over the plan for the day and pick a safe space wherever we are 💙

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  50. I'm still working on finding the best techniques for my 4 year old. It seems that giving advanced notice of what's happening helps, as does warning about any changes as soon as I know they'll happen. But I can't always manage to prevent the meltdowns, which we honestly just have to ride out.

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  51. I try and talk to my daughter calmly, she's usually ok x

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I read all your comments and appreciate you sharing your thoughts with me and our readers. I welcome any feedback on my posts and you can always contact me directly. Thank you.

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